Författare Ämne: Historien om Trakerna  (läst 3191 gånger)

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Historien om Trakerna
« skrivet: januari 02, 2012, 00:36 »
Trakerna  - Europas äldsta civilisation?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKLy_0wKcWM&feature=share
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Utloggad Vinstorparn

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« Svar #1 skrivet: januari 02, 2012, 09:52 »

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« Svar #2 skrivet: januari 03, 2012, 19:29 »
Området är oerhört rikt på gedigna fynd från yngre stenålder/äldre bronsålder Här är den kanske vackraste fynden - en blad-dolk av guld och platina i legering - från bondestenåldern:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/5251266.stm
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Europas äldsta stad?
« Svar #3 skrivet: oktober 13, 2012, 13:52 »
Nyligen etablerades att en stadsstruktur hittat utanför Varna är ca. 6.500  år:

Citera

Europe’s oldest urban settlement is near Provadia, 40 km inland from Bulgaria’s Black Sea city of Varna, according to archaeology Professor Vassil Nikolov, citing evidence from work done at the Provadia – Solnitsata archaeological site in summer 2012.

The team of archaeologists headed by Nikolov excavated stone walls estimated to date from 4700 to 4200 BCE. The walls are two metres thick and three metres high, and according to Nikolov are the earliest and most massive fortifications from Europe’s pre-history.

There were about 300 to 350 people living at the site in those times, living in two-storey houses and earning their living by salt mining.


http://sofiaglobe.com/2012/10/08/archaeology-europes-oldest-town-found-near-bulgarias-varna-professor-says/#!prettyPhoto/0/
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« Svar #4 skrivet: oktober 31, 2012, 22:32 »
"Europas äldsta stad" också på BBC:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-20156681
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Utloggad Lars Croft

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« Svar #5 skrivet: november 01, 2012, 00:01 »
Masken på översta bilden i länken från allt om vetenskap är ju helt enormt lik ''Agamemnons mask''. Kanske inte världens mest konstiga sätt att avbilda ett ansikte, men intressant ändå med den tids- och kulturskillnaden.

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« Svar #6 skrivet: maj 07, 2013, 23:42 »
Nyligen publicerades bilder från fjolårets fynd från en oplundrad gravhög i Bulgarien, fyld med "hundratalls föremån av guld" - efter dom gamla Getar i det dåvarande Trakien:

Citera

"The Thracians are the most powerful people in the world, except, of course, for the Indians,” wrote the fifth-century B.C. Greek historian Herodotus. In citing the Thracians, he was referring to the group of tribes who inhabited a large part of the Balkans and parts of Western Anatolia—from the Aegean to the Carpathian Mountains, and as far as the Caucasus—from approximately the twelfth century B.C. to the sixth century A.D. Despite their fearsome reputation, relatively little is known about them. Few examples of their writing survive, and what other information we have comes from Greek literary sources and Thracian burial mounds."

This past November, archaeologist Diana Gergova of the National Institute of Archaeology at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences entered the burial chamber of an almost 60-foot-tall mound in the Sveshtari necropolis, some 250 miles northeast of the Bulgarian capital of Sofia.

There she discovered a wooden chest filled with hundreds of gold artifacts. Gergova believes that the burial belonged to a ruler of the Getae, one of the most powerful of the Thracian tribes, who, around 2,400 years ago, were “at their absolute height, politically, culturally, and militarily.”

According to Gergova, the finely crafted gold treasures from Sveshtari help confirm the ancient writers’ accounts of Thracian culture. The craftsmanship also reveals previously unknown stylistic connections to the northern and western regions of the Black Sea, providing evidence for a wide cultural ring across Thracian lands.

The site could also provide new insight into the Thracian religion, including their belief in the immortal nature of the human soul, which may have influenced early Christianity, says Gergova. “These finds have given us an incredible amount of information about the burial and post-burial practices of the northern Thracians.”


http://archaeology.org/issues/90-1305/trenches/747-bulgaria-thracian-burial-chamber-gold-artifacts
“It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled.”